3935 Avion Park Court, Suite A102, Chantilly, VA 20151   ph: 703-378-9791   Fax. 703-997-7786

Vaccinations

Your pet is susceptible to many serious and life threatening diseases. Fortunately, NOVA Pets Health Center offers pet vaccinations to protect against many of these potentially fatal illnesses. We recommend several vaccinations to prevent serious diseases in dogs and cats such as Rabies, DHPP, Bordetella, FeLV, etc.

At NOVA Pets Health Center, we believe that preventive pet care is the key to a long, healthy, and happy life. Recommended pet vaccinations are included in our Preventative Care/ Wellness Plans. Our plans also include annual wellness exams, diagnostic tests, dental care, and more! NPHC’s wellness plans are designed to provide pet owners with a comprehensive and affordable solution to maintaining optimal health for their pets through prevention and early detection.

Vaccinations for Your Puppy or Dog

To protect your dog against common diseases we recommend the following vaccinations:

Rabies

Rabies is caused by an RNA virus transmitted through direct contact with infected mammals (primarily bite wounds). The Rabies virus attacks the brain and is most often fatal. If a dog is due for rabies or if this is the first vaccine, the animal is not considered fully immunized for 29 days.

The Rabies vaccine should be boostered within one year following the initial Rabies vaccination. Once this second Rabies vaccine has been administered, dogs should receive Rabies vaccines every three years unless regulations in the community demand otherwise.

DHPP (Distemper Vaccine)

DHPP stands for Distemper, Hepatitis, Parvovirus and Parainfluenza because the vaccination is generally combined with a vaccine for canine parvovirus as well for parainfluenza, adenovirus 2 (Hepatitis). The two most significant components of the DHPP shot are the Parvovirus and the Distemper as both of these viruses usually lead to death, especially in puppies.

Parvovirus causes vomiting and bloody diarrhea and Distemper causes flu-like symptoms which lead to severe neurological issues such as seizures. Due to the fatal nature of these diseases, the distemper shot is considered an essential vaccine for dogs.
Puppies should begin their distemper vaccinations between age 6 to 8 weeks of age, and then every 2 to 4 weeks until they are 16 weeks old. The next vaccine is administered one year later. After the initial vaccinations, boosters are administered every 1 to 3 years, depending on their antibody levels and the policies of the supervising animal hospital.

Bordetella (kennel cough):

This is a contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract, which includes the trachea (windpipe) and bronchi (large air passages of the lungs). The most common sign of kennel cough is harsh, dry cough that is often followed by gagging and coughing up foamy mucus. The disease spreads rapidly from one dog to another through the air and direct contact. In severe cases, or when left untreated, the virus can turn into broncheophenmonia which could potentially lead to death; especially in young puppies.

Puppies should receive their first Bordetella vaccination when they are eight-weeks-old with a second vaccination at 13 weeks of age. After the first the year, it is recommended to administer a booster every 6 to 12 months; especially if they are in frequent contact with other dogs.

Leptospirosis Vaccine

(This vaccination is optional but highly recommended).

The transmission of the Leptospirosis infection is usually acquired through contact with soil, food, water, bedding, and other fomites that have been contaminated with infected urine. The bacteria is most commonly found in soil that is moist and has a neutral pH, as well as in stagnant or slow-moving warm water. Water is most often contaminated from the urine of infected animals, as the bacteria may shed in the urine for months after an infection.

The infection spreads to a variety of tissues, including the kidneys, liver, spleen, pancreas, the central nervous system, genital tract, and eyes. The bacteria commonly localizes in the kidneys, causing impaired renal function. Acute nephritis (inflammation of the kidneys) develops and may progress to chronic renal failure.

Leptospirosis does occur in people and contaminated urine may be highly infectious. When treating ill animals and cleaning cages or utensils used on those animals, gloves should be worn. Goggles and protective facemasks are beneficial while washing and hosing contaminated areas. Absorbent bedding should be handled carefully with gloves and then discarded. Pet owners should be warned of the possible health hazards to humans and other animals from dogs that are actively infected, as well as from carrier animals.

Lyme Vaccine

(This vaccination is optional but highly recommended).

Lyme disease is transmitted to dogs after a tick attaches, and begins to feed on the dog’s blood. If the tick is removed from the dog’s skin within the first 12 hours of feeding, the there is little risk of infection. However, after 12 hours, the risk of infection increases significantly, especially if the tic has been feeding for a prolonged period of time.

Lyme disease can cause an inflammatory condition of the joints, heart, central nervous system, and other tissues. Recurrent episodes can result in chronic disease and arthritis. The best form of Lyme disease prevention is through annual vaccinations. It is recommended to administer the Lyme vaccine prior to tick season.

Vaccinations for Your Kitten or Cat

To protect your cat against common diseases we recommend the following vaccinations:

Cat receiving vaccination

Rabies

Rabies is caused by an RNA virus transmitted through direct contact with infected mammals (primarily bite wounds). The rabies virus attacks the brain and is most often fatal. More cats than dogs are diagnosed with rabies infection in the U.S. If a dog is due for rabies or if this is the first vaccine, the animal is not considered fully immunized for 29 days.

The rabies vaccine should be boostered within one year following the initial rabies vaccination. Once this second rabies vaccine has been administered, cats should receive rabies vaccines on an annual basis unless regulations in the community demand otherwise.

Bordetella /Bronchiseptica for Cats

Bordetella is transmitted through airborne pathogens, saliva, and respiratory secretions such as sneezing and coughing. It is a significant and increasingly troublesome pathogen in animal shelters housing large numbers of cats. Symptoms in infected cats rang from mild upper respiratory signs to severe pulmonary and systemic signs. In severe cases, or when left untreated, the virus can turn into broncheophenmonia which could potentially lead to death; especially in young kittens.

Kittens should receive their first Bordetella vaccination when they are eight-weeks-old with a second vaccination at 13 weeks of age. After the first the year, it is recommended to administer a booster every 6 to 12 months; especially if they are in frequent contact with other cats.

FeLV

FeLV, or The Feline Leukemia Virus, is considered to be the number 1 cause of serious illnesses and deaths in domestic cats. The disease can be transmitted among cats through a number of ways including: casual contact with saliva, mucus, urine, feces, and blood. Other forms of transmissions include passing from mother to kitten, mutual grooming, and fighting. Experimental data demonstrates that young kittens younger than 16 weeks of age, are highly susceptible to the infection.

FeLV causes a cat’s immune system to breakdown, causing it to become highly susceptible to other serious diseases which it would normally be able to fight off. Once the virus enters the body, it will begin reproducing in your cat’s main system of immunological defense- their lymph tissue. From here, the virus will make its way to the bone marrow, interrupting the production of red and white blood cells and breaking down vital components of their immune system. Feline Leukemia Virus is specific to cats and cannot be transmitted to other species such as dogs or humans.

After your kitten receives its initial series of vaccinations during the first year, the Feline Leukemia Vaccine should be administered once a year. In addition to yearly vaccinations, routine testing for the virus is the best way to prevent transmission.

Fvrcp

Fvrcp stands for Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus Infection, Calicivirus Infection. The FVRCP vaccine contains three preventative agents: Rhinotracheitis, Caliciviruses, and Panleukopenia.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR) and Feline Calicivirus (FVC) are extremely contagious airborne upper respiratory infections. FVR is caused by the type 1 feline herpes-virus. Both FVR and FVC are chronic diseases that are most debilitating for young kittens and senior cats. Signs include: lethargy, sneezing, coughing, discharge from the nostrils and the eyes, and fever. The virus can turn into pneumonia and occasionally eye ulcers. FCV may also be shed in the feces. Transmission occurs through sneezed macrodroplets, direct from cat to cat, or via contaminated fomites (hands, feeding bowls, etc.). Although the disease is rarely fatal in adult cats, young kittens may develop severe symptoms of this disease which can lead to death.

HAVE A QUESTION?

Phone: (703) 378-9791
Fax: (703) 997-7786
Email: info@novapets.com

HOURS OF OPERATION

Mon-Fri
7am-6pm
Sat (Noon)
8am-Noon
Sat
5:30pm-6pm*
Sun
5:30pm-6pm*

*Pick-up and/or drop-off only.


Vaccination-Related Side Effects

Common Vaccination Related Side Effects

All vaccinations- whether administered to a human or animal- bear the risk of potential side-effects. The most common side effects caused by routine vaccinations include:


– A Low-Grade Fever
(He or she will seem warm to the touch)

– Tiredness/ Lethargy
– Loss of Appetite

 

These side effects are a natural response to the vaccine’s effect on the immune system. The side effects occur within a day of the vaccination and last between 24-28 hours. If your dog or cat has these symptoms, keep an eye on them and make sure they are drinking water. If symptoms last more than 48 hours, call the NOVA Pets Heath Center Veterinarian right away, as they will be able to treat the symptoms.

Rare Vaccination Related Side Effects

Rare side effects include an allergic reactions to the vaccine. These reactions could happen within minutes or hours of the vaccination and could include:


– Vomiting
– Diarrhea
– Difficulty Breathing
– Possible Collapse
– Swelling in Face and Body
– Hives

– Extreme Lethargy and Unwillingness to Move

If your dog or cat experiences these side effects, call the NOVA Pets Heath Center Veterinarian right away, as they will be able to treat the symptoms. If you have any questions about the vaccines we offer, or would like to learn more about our Preventative Care/Wellness Plans call us at (703) 378-9791 or make an appointment today.

RECENT TALKS.

What to Do If Your Pet Ingests a Rodenticide

pet Rodenticide

2017-01-27

Sometimes our pets get into things we really wish they wouldn’t. If your pet manages to consume some type of rodenticide, then it is important to act quickly to prevent lasting damage. It is important to know that there are read more...

Obesity in Pets

Obesity in Pets

2017-01-25

How many of us see our pets begging for food and give in to their “act of starvation”? What we don’t think about is how our pets could be playing us! No animal wants to be on a diet, but as pet owners, we need to be awar read more...

Proper Etiquette for Pets

dog etiquette

2017-01-24

Going to the vet can be stressful for both animals and their humans. Here are some helpful tips to follow when bringing your pet to the vet that can make both yours and others’ visit less stressful! 1) Keep your pet control read more...

Copyright © 2015 NOVA PETS. All right reserved. Design and Developed by Debtech LLC
Call Back

Request a Call Back